Delish

Breakfast, lunch, dinner, and even snacks—this subscription service for kids aged 5 and up has a focus on building an interest and ability in cooking for kids to one day explore independently. It comes with kitchen tools correctly sized for kids hands, too.

The Toy Insider

Bon appétit!

It’s time to get cooking with monthly Kidstir subscription boxes, which provide kids with healthy recipes that they can make themselves.

Each month, a fresh box is delivered to families’ doors, chock full of kid-friendly recipes to pass along the joy of cookings (and baking). Boxes focus on seasonal ingredients and special occasions and include specially selected cooking tools and creative materials for aspiring chefs.

Before each box is delivered, Kidstir will send parents an email with a shopping list of the ingredients needed for the new dishes and other “grown-up notes” to help guide their kids’ food journeys.

Get ready to cook up a storm — and rid your home of any picky eating habits — with appetizers, baked goods, soups, salads, dinners, and more recipes.

Dining In

Fancy it up! You don’t need to dine out at a French restaurant for a grand dinner.

Here are our top Kidstir tips for having a restaurant experience at home and turning any simple meal into a special occasion. Making a meal feel a little fancy is a great way to bond, teach manners and celebrate a great day. 

Start by getting your little one excited. They can write out a menu of what they are making — picture menus work too! Next, set the table, and fold napkins just like how they do it at restaurants. Now the important question: what’s for dinner? You could cook up this month’s kit, or prepare a Kidstir classic. You’ll feel like five stars making our Baked Salmon or Pasta Caprese

After you’re done cooking, everyone dresses up and comes to the table in style. Turn on music, light some candles, and say “Cheers!” For a cherry on top, add a vase of flowers, and serve on your best plates. Remember, use your best table manners: say “please” and “thank you,” and kiss the cook!

It’s great to slow down and celebrate the little things. You could toast a day of chores well done, a new skill learned, or a scholastic achievement. You could even encourage good habits — like letting your little chef host a meal when they finish a book and having them tell you all about it over dinner! By taking the time to acknowledge these moments, you motivate good behavior and create great memories for the whole family.

Onigiri

Onigiri

Onigiri, or rice balls, are a popular snack in Japan. Some people even eat them for breakfast! These little rice shapes take many forms and have been around for hundreds of years. Starting in the 1600s, many people began adding nori to the rice, to keep their hands from getting sticky while eating. 

Nori would grow to become a popular way of decorating, too, and today, creative folks make all kinds of creatures and shapes out of this delicious dish. Who says you can’t play with your food? 

Try recreating some of these fun onigiri for yourself:

  • Use your nori to make eyes and a mustache for a little onigiri man
  • Surround your rice with ramen to give a mane to your onigiri lion
  • Drop in some food coloring and add sesame seeds for onigiri watermelon slices

Kawaii

Photo of Kawaii Food

Have you ever heard the term “kawaii”? If not, you’ve probably seen it. This term loosely translates to a “culture of cuteness” that Japanese people hold dear. It’s the reason why so many characters, designs, merchandise, and cartoons that come from the island nation are so, well, adorable. 

Interestingly, the word kawaii originally comes from “kao hayushi,” which means “blushing.” Characters that are considered cute within Japanese culture are often shy or bashful, which means people tend to care for them more.

You might have spotted a few kawaii characters hidden throughout our Bento Box cooking kit. Can you name other examples of these loveable designs?

 

Mouthwatering Miso

Miso Soup

Miso soup is a staple in Japanese cuisine. In fact, it’s believed that on average, people in Japan eat it about once a day! Made from miso paste and traditional fish stock called “dashi,” this dish is best served when fresh and warm. Don’t forget to add tofu, if desired!

A Sprinkle of Furikake

Furikake

Furikake is a common household item in Japan. Many homecooks even them keep furikake in their spice cabinets at home and use it to flavor a variety of different foods. In the U.S., you might find furikake at an Asian market or festival. But today we’ll teach you how to make it yourself!

*Grown-up Note: If you only have raw sesame seeds at home, help your kids toast them in a skillet on low heat before preparing the rest of this recipe. Advise them to stir the seeds every minute or so until they become fragrant and lightly toasted. This should take about 7-8 minutes.

Pick Up Activity

You can look forward to some excitement with your special Compact Cutlery Set. Enjoy your meal even more with your very own fork, spoon, and pair of chopsticks. Take your pack with you anywhere you go. Not only does it hold the tools you need to eat your food, but it’s reusable (and good for the planet!).

Need some practice with your new chopsticks? No worries! We’ll have you mastering them in no time. First, find some (or all) of these items from around the house. Anything small or easy to grasp will do.

  • Erasers
  • Cereal
  • Candy
  • Buttons
  • Jewelry
  • Fish crackers
  • Tiny toys or doll pieces

Next, put all of the items into a pile between you. Then get ready to pick them up. Fastest wins!