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Healthy Halloween

Washington Post & New York Times articles - Kidstir

 
Kids have a tendency to binge on unhealthy snacks at Halloween after Trick-or-Treating every October. If you’d like to see fewer candy bars and more healthy snacks for your kids we’d like to help make sweets a little less scary. We found that the Washington Post agrees with an article titled “A Healthier Halloween for Kids“. Trying to teach kids to have a healthier Halloween can be tough. One of our favorite comments from author is:

Think about how you want your family to approach food and treats, and consider the example you’re setting with your eating habits. Do your kids see you making your way to the candy bowl every night? Practice the same balanced food habits you want your kids to have as adults. – Christy Brissette

If you’ve subscribed to the Kidstir cooking kits, you can look forward to our Spooky Celebration Kit in October. One of the fun tools in that kit is our “Freaky Freeze” silicone mold that allows you to make some spooky Fruit Gummies that are healthy alternative for Halloween snacks.

Help exercise kids imaginations by labeling healthy snacks with scary names using our printable Spooky food snack labels to help visualize some scary snacks:

  • Monster teeth – almond slices
  • Goblin ears – dried apples
  • Witch warts – raisins
  • Big scary scabs – dried apricots
  • Ghost poop – yogurt covered raisins
  • Frankenstein fingernails – sunflower seeds

The New York Times offers some suggestions in an article by Lisa Damour titled “3 Ways to Get Kids to Eat Better” where she again recommends we set an example:

It’s helpful to remember that talking about food choices is only one of the ways we shape how our children eat. Indeed, research consistently demonstrates that what children consume tends to match what their parents consume, both in terms of food quality and quantity.